International

Malawi Protest: Free Tiwonge and Steven

Drop the charges and repeal anti-gay laws

Commonwealth must condemn homophobic persecution in Malawi

Many people attended the protest against the arrest, trial and
imprisonment of the Malawian same-sex couple, Steven Monjeza and
Tiwonge Chimbalanga, on charges of homosexuality. They face up to 14 years jail.

Monday 22 March
12.30pm to 2pm
Commonwealth Secretariat’s head office, Marlborough House, Pall Mall,
London SW1Y 5HX.
By the corner of Pall Mall and St James’s Street.

Malawian LGBT rights protest

© OutRage! 1990-2010. You are free to use this photo to illustrate news stories and articles about OutRage!, the lesbian and gay human rights group, with credit to the group and photographer. For all other uses, please inquire. Photos: Brett Lock, OutRage!

Peter Tatchell at the LGBT CommonWeath protest

On the 21.03.10 Peter Tatchell was talking in front of the Commonweath asking why the Commonweath was doing nothing to stop the criminalisation of same-sex relations in 40 Commonweath countries. The LGBT community and OutRage are asking for the release of Malawi gay couple Tiwonge and Steven and an end of same-sex relations criminalisation in all the Commonweath countries.
Write to Dr. Francis Moto, High Commission of Malawi, 70 Winnington road, London N2 0TX. Email malawihighcom@btconnect.com

Protest in London Against Uganda Bill: Peter Tatchell – OutRage! gay activist

Nearly 100 protesters rallied outside the Ugandan Embassy in London on Human Rights Day to support the Ugandan LBGTI community. They called on the Ugandan government to drop its draconian Anti-Homosexuality Bill, which is currently being debated by the Ugandan parliament.

Under this proposed law, LGBTI Ugandans will face execution for certain homosexual acts and life imprisonment for all other same-sex acts – even mere caressing and kissing.

The London protesters included LGBTI activists from the UK and of Jamican descent, plus LGBTI campaigners from Uganda, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Cameroon, Nigeria, the Congo and Kenya.

Peter Tatchell talking to press at Pride London Parade 2009 about homophobia in Jamaica

Pride London Patron and Human Rights Campaigner Peter Tatchell talks about the horrendous levels of homophobia faced by LGBT Jamaicans. You can read more about this issue and all of Peter and Outrage’s other campaigns at www.petertatchell.net

Support Mehdi Kazemi protest

London, 22 March 2008 – More than 100 protesters gathered in Whitehall opposite Downing Street in support of Mehdi Kazemi’s asylum appeal. Mr Kazemi, a gay man, is threatened with deportation to Iran where LGBT people risk torture and execution.

© OutRage! 1990-2010. You are free to use this photo to illustrate news stories and articles about OutRage!, the lesbian and gay human rights group, with credit to the group and photographer. For all other uses, please inquire. Photos: Brett Lock, OutRage!

Iranian LGBTs deserve asylum

Activists Arsham Parsi and Peter Tatchell explain the life-threatening situation for lesbian and gay people in Iran, during the BBC News (12 March 2008) item on gay asylum seeker, Mehdi Kazemi.

Saudi Protest

London – 31 October 2007. Outside the Saudi Arabian Embassy, campaigners gathered to protest against human rights abuses in Saudi Arabia, co-inciding with the state visit by King Abdullah. Pictured is Peter Tatchell of OutRage!

© OutRage! 1990-2010. You are free to use this photo to illustrate news stories and articles about OutRage!, the lesbian and gay human rights group, with credit to the group and photographer. For all other uses, please inquire. Photos: Brett Lock, OutRage!

Stop Saudi homophobia!

Protesters picketed the Saudi Arabian Embassy in London to condemn the flogging and execution queers. The protest was organised by the National Union of Students LGBT campaign, with the support of LGBT human rights group OutRage! Peter Tatchell was a guest speaker.

© OutRage! 1990-2010. You are free to use this photo to illustrate news stories and articles about OutRage!, the lesbian and gay human rights group, with credit to the group and photographer. For all other uses, please inquire. Photos: Brett Lock, OutRage!

Jamaica – homophobia, murder music and free speech

Is Jamaica is the most homophobic country in the world? Does reggae / dancehall “murder music” contribute to anti-gay violence? Stop Murder Music campaigners, Dennis Carney of the Black Gay Men’s Advisory Group, and Brett Lock of the gay human rights group OutRage!, discuss with Peter Tatchell. Watch here:

http://doughty.gdbtv.com/player.php?h=ea549f923a51daa4d050241c6b6d6c94

Peter Tatchell writes:

Eight leading Jamaican reggae /dancehall stars, including Buju Banton and Beenie Man, have sung songs openly advocating, encouraging and glorifying the murder of queers.

See their homophobic “murder music” lyrics here:
http://www.petertatchell.net/popmusic/Dancehall-Dossier-FINAL.pdf

Are these artists merely reflecting homophobia or helping create it?

Many gay and straight Jamaicans argue that lyrics urging the killing of queers may not create homophobia but they certainly help legitimate and encourage it. When homophobic violence is extolled by big-name reggae super stars it fuels and reinforces anti-gay hatred. It encourages some young men to believe that it is cool and acceptable to bash lesbian and gay people.

These murder music lyrics stir up homophobic hatred and violence, in the same way that the BNP’s racist incitements stir up racial hatred and violence.

Can it ever be acceptable or legitimate to subject other people to violent threats and intimidation? Are homophobic incitements any less worthy of condemnation than racist ones?

Critics of the Stop Murder Music campaign claim it is an attack on freedom of expression. They protest: what about free speech? But since when has free speech included the right to incite the murder of other human beings?

Do the defenders of homophobic murder music also defend the right of white racists to incite the murder of black people? No, of course, they don’t. They rightly condemn even the slightest prejudice against the black community. So why the double standards when it comes to homophobic bigotry?

The murder music singers are not the only culprits. The Jamaican government and police are notorious for their inaction against homophobic violence. According to Jamaican law, inciting violence and murder is a criminal offence. Why aren’t these artists being prosecuted?

Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch report that homophobic violence is a major problem in Jamaica. This is corroborated by Jamaican human rights groups such as Jamaicans for Justice, Families Against State Terrorism, Jamaica AIDS Support, and the Independent Jamaica Council for Human Rights.

All these respected bodies accuse the Jamaican government and police of colluding with queer-bashing attacks, and of failing to protect the gay victims of mob violence.

Ending murder music will not, of itself, end anti-gay violence. But it can contribute to deescalating the culture of homophobia that is terrorising lesbian and gay Jamaicans and wrecking their lives.

To view the programme, click on this link:

http://doughty.gdbtv.com/player.php?h=ea549f923a51daa4d050241c6b6d6c94

Note:

Talking With Tatchell is broadcast every Friday night at 8.30pm on the internet TV channel, www.18doughtystreet.com

Previous programmes are permanently archived. Type “Tatchell” into the Search facility to access all past editions of Talking With Tatchell.